The Fight for the Bight
is at a crucial stage.

The people of Australia and beyond have spoken up for the Great Australian Bight. Tens of thousands of people from all over the country have paddled out to protest Equinor’s intention to turn the Bight into a deep water oil field. Over 30,000 people wrote to the industry regulator formally opposing Equinor’s plan.

Industry regulator NOPSEMA have requested Equinor revise their environment plan and have given them 60 days to do so. Meanwhile the Federal Government’s Independent Audit into NOPSEMA’s consideration of exploration in the Bight has commenced.

NOPSEMA’s judgment of the revised environmental plan is expected to drop as early as September which is in line with Equinor’s plans to begin exploratory drilling in 2020.

The Fight for the Bight is far from over. We need to keep the pressure on Equinor and on the Federal Government. The Bight needs to remain wild and free.

Say NO to Big Oil by sending a letter to
Equinor’s CEO Eldar Saetre.
Take Action

Independent Examination of Equinor’s Environmental Plan

The Sydney Environmental Institute at the University of Sydney convened an independent group of oil and gas industry specialists with backgrounds in science, law and academia to examine Equinor’s plan in detail and make a special submission to NOPSEMA.

The group found: “Throughout its Environment Plan (EP) the operator, Equinor, has consistently made optimistic choices in order to convince the public and NOPSEMA that “it is safe” to drill Stromlo-1.”

Read the report in full here.

Independent Examination of Equinor’s Environmental Plan

Of particular note the submission cites:

• A failure to consult Indigenous organisations.

• A failure to consult with groups deemed outside an arbitrarily declared impact zone - a 40km radius around the Stromlo-1 well which is almost 400km off the coast in the middle of the Southern Ocean – despite their own spill modelling showing thousands of kilometres of Australian coastline potentially affected.

Independent Examination of Equinor’s Environmental Plan

Of particular note the submission cites:

• A failure to adequately consider safeguards for the 41 listed threatened species found in the Bight.

• A failure to quantify the “human, technological and financial resources” that would be needed to conduct an oil spill clean-up in the Bight.

Independent Examination of Equinor’s Environmental Plan

Of particular note the submission cites:

• The submission also suggests that “very little reliance should be placed on the risk calculations upon which Equinor wants to rely to predict blowout probability at Stromlo-1.”

• An inaccurate and miscalculated estimate of the sea state in the Bight – an argument that has been repeatedly echoed by surfers and scientists alike.

The Fight for the Bight goes to Norway

In May this year, a delegation from the Great Australian Bight Alliance travelled to Norway to take the fight to Equinor’s doorstep. Patagonia ambassador and Bight local Heath Joske led a paddle out protest in Oslo and addressed the Annual General Meeting of Equinor. The Norwegian surf community has stood side-by-side with their Australian counterparts, and they took Heath on a surf trip to Norway’s Lofoten Islands where they have faced similar threats of offshore oil development from Equinor.

In May this year, a delegation from the Great Australian Bight Alliance travelled to Norway to take the fight to Equinor’s doorstep. Patagonia ambassador and Bight local Heath Joske led a paddle out protest in Oslo and addressed the Annual General Meeting of Equinor. The Norwegian surf community has stood side-by-side with their Australian counterparts, and they took Heath on a surf trip to Norway’s Lofoten Islands where they have faced similar threats of offshore oil development from Equinor.

Steve Ryan

Thousands of people rallied around Australia for the Great Australian Bight. The Fight for the Bight has become a surf and coastal activist movement the likes of which Australia hasn’t seen in decades.

Torquay, Victoria
Matty Hannon

Thousands of people rallied around Australia for the Great Australian Bight. The Fight for the Bight has become a surf and coastal activist movement the likes of which Australia hasn’t seen in decades.

Yamba, New South Wales
Murray Fraser

Thousands of people rallied around Australia for the Great Australian Bight. The Fight for the Bight has become a surf and coastal activist movement the likes of which Australia hasn’t seen in decades.

Manly, New South Wales
Che Chorley

Thousands of people rallied around Australia for the Great Australian Bight. The Fight for the Bight has become a surf and coastal activist movement the likes of which Australia hasn’t seen in decades.

Victor Harbour, South Australia

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